Completed disability projects

Disability is not only about physical dysfunction but has a broader scope, including stigma, discrimination, and social participation restrictions. Important underlying causes of physical dysfunction include neural and ocular impairments. The LRI therefore supports research that can contribute to preventing or lessening the burden of disability, including the investigation of new treatment options, risk factors and detection of nerve function impairment, preventive interventions and prevalence surveys. Other NTDs may be included alongside leprosy.

 

<< Supported projects

 

 

 

 

COMPLETED PROJECTS

 

Map the gap

Project coordination

Netherlands Leprosy Relief Indonesia

Country

Indonesia

 

This study has systematically and comprehensively collected information about enabling and disabling factors influencing the successful provision of inclusive medical rehabilitation services for persons with disability due to leprosy, lymphatic filariasis and diabetes mellitus. Knowledge and models that are generated from this research will be used for advocacy and to improve services.

 

Read more ...

Reduction of plantar pressure

Project coordination

The Leprosy Mission International (Bangladesh)

Country

Bangladesh

 

Health care interventions are continually evolving and developing, but the use of micro-cellular rubber (MCR) footwear as the first-line intervention for protecting the feet of people with sensory loss has remained unchanged since the early 1960. This study sought to quantify the differences or similarities between MCR commonly sourced in Bangladesh and footwear available in the Bangladesh market. Final results of this project are available.

 

Read more ...

Burden of treatment for people with leprosy

Project coordination

Menzies Health Institute of Queensland, Griffith University (Australia)

Country

Myanmar

 

The research group conducted an in-depth exploration of  "burden of treatment" in leprosy within Myanmar as a case example. They used a participatory group-based approach, with people affected by leprosy as key collaborators in the research.

 

Read more ...